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Things unearthed (Friday Fictioneers)

August 18, 2022
@ Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

The image was of a time best forgotten. Finding it in the basement was a shock. We were huddled there in the hopes of surviving another planetary bombardment from the Tesh. “What is that?” My youngest asked.

“Oh, a painting love, of a time long ago when it was safe to walk the surface. Those things, they’re called seashells.”

“What do they do?”

“Look pretty, I guess.” I didn’t want the memories. I hoped for no more questions.

“Who painted it?”

Damn. The question I didn’t want. “My Aunt. She was gifted, but very mean.”

“Well, I love you, mommy.”

This is a Friday Fictioneers Prompt

You can read more FF prompt responses here

Word count: 100

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20 Comments
  1. Yes, you show how children have a constant barrage of questions that drill into the memories you want to suppress. Nicely done.

  2. You created a whole world there in so few words

  3. Dear Laurie,

    I happen to know the painter and I don’t think she’s mean. 😉 Seriously, children do press in with their questions, don’t they? No doubt the narrator has memories she’d rather forget. Nicely done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

  4. The five whys of quality assurance were invented by children many years ago. 🙂

  5. This was an interesting way to unfold your story.
    I enjoyed reading it. The kids reminded me of mine.
    I guess they’re always asking due to curiosity. Nicely done …
    Have a good weekend … Isadora 😎

  6. She is trapped in many ways. Hoping she gets relief!

  7. Little kids have no clue about the memories, good and bad, that are connected to things.

  8. Well, the Tesh will never know the beauty of the shells.

  9. Leave it to a child to know what needed to be said. Great story, Laurie. 🙂

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